Primate Typings: The Tumblr

Touch typing would be easier with opposable thumbs

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For many of these women, the reading experience begins from a place of seething rage. Take Sara Marcus’ initial impression of Jack Kerouac: “I remember putting On the Road down the first time a woman was mentioned. I was just like: ‘Fuck. You.’ I was probably 15 or 16. And over the coming years I realized that it was this canonical work, so I tried to return to it, but every time I was just like, ‘Fuck you.’” Tortorici had a similarly visceral reaction to Charles Bukowski: “I will never forget reading Bukowski’s Post Office and feeling so horrible, the way that the narrator describes the thickness of ugly women’s legs. I think it was the first time I felt like a book that I was trying to identify with rejected me. Though I did absorb it, and of course it made me hate my body or whatever.” Emily Witt turned to masculine texts to access a sexual language that was absent from books about women, but found herself turned off by their take: “many of the great classic coming-of-age novels about the female experience don’t openly discuss sex,” she says in No Regrets. “I read the ones by men instead, until I was like, ‘I cannot read another passage about masturbation. I can’t. It was like a pile of Kleenex.”

This isn’t just about the books. When young women read the hyper-masculine literary canon—what Emily Gould calls the “midcentury misogynists,” staffed with the likes of Roth, Mailer, and Miller—their discomfort is punctuated by the knowledge that their male peers are reading these books, identifying with them, and acting out their perspectives and narratives. These writers are celebrated by the society that we live in, even the one who stabbed his wife. In No Regrets, Elif Bautman talks about reading Henry Miller for the first time because she had a “serious crush” on a guy who said his were “the best books ever,” and that guy’s real-life recommendation exacerbated her distaste for the fictional. When she read Miller, “I felt so alienated by the books, and then thinking about this guy, and it was so hot and summertime … I just wanted to kill myself. … He compared women to soup.”

In No Regrets, women writers talk about what it was like to read literature’s “midcentury misogynists.” (via becauseiamawoman)

Here’s a fun thing you learn when you study literature: the western canon is not universally beloved. Those books are not the Truth any more than the New York Post is skilled journalism. The main reason they’re held in such high esteem is because they were written by boring white dudes with rage fantasies and boring white dudes with rage fantasies also happen to be largely in charge of deciding which books are deemed classics and taught forever in the American school system.
So if your boyfriend tells you he loves Kerouac then you tell your boyfriend Kerouac was a fucking second rate hack who wrote Beat style because he didn’t have the skill or talent to write any other way, which is probably also why he just copied every adolescent male wanderlust story since the beginning of time. That shit’s derivative and boring.

(via saintthecla)

(via darrylayo)

165 notes

hbreckel:

Presentation is Important

Every now and then I’ll critique lettering or presentation in an amateur comic. Common problems are terrible font choices or word bubbles that are obviously an afterthought. Usually when I bring it to the person’s attention I get the reply of “it’s just a font” or “comic sans has the word comic in it, X-Men uses it” (no it doesn’t)

I want to remind anyone that has ever wanted to do comics professionally that presentation matters. Lettering matters. Coloring matters. Penciling matters. Inking matters. Editing matters. Story matters. I understand that we all want to be rock star pencillers or writers and lettering is just for peasants, but if you want to be a professional, you need to at least act like you care about what you’re doing.

Nothing says “I don’t give a shit about what my work looks like” than Comic Sans or Times New Roman in a poorly constructed word bubble. It’s all too often that people will tell me they do all their lettering at the last minute and it really shows. Don’t do that.

Here are some handy dandy tips on not only lettering, but overall presentation. (note, I am not a professional letterer so I am not an expert on the subject. But bare minimum I know how to not make it hideous)

  • If the font can be used in a term paper, it does not belong in a comic.
  • If the word “comic” is in the font title, that does not mean it’s a good font for comics. If you see the font being used by soccer moms in PTA letters or being used on shady business establishment signs, you probably don’t want to use it.
  • Some of the best comic lettering fonts on the planet can be found at http://www.comicbookfonts.com/ they are pricey, but can be found for sale all the time. People that don’t want to spend money on fonts can find perfectly acceptable fonts at http://www.blambot.com/ 
  • Care about text placement. There should not be 5 miles of space around your dialogue in the word bubble.

  • Plan your pages better. Stop sticking 5 paragraphs into a tiny panel. That will never ever work and will waste time. If you need a lot of dialogue in a panel, draw it that way.
  • Transparent word bubbles aren’t a good idea. If you didn’t want to cover the character, you should have laid the page out better.
  • Colored fonts and word bubbles are rarely appropriate. Really the only times I can think of is for a really evil character. In 90% of cases, you should be smart enough to lay out word bubbles in a way that does not make it confusing for the reader. You should not need to color code dialogue like a crappy anime fansub from 2005.
  • If you can’t digitally color, don’t do it in something you’re getting paid to do. No seriously. It’s too often I see someone color a comic page they intend to show prospective employers and are like “lol I’m just starting to learn to color”. No. Don’t do that. If you’re just doing it for fun as practice, that’s totally fine as obviously you have to start somewhere. But it’s not okay if you want to get HIRED for something.

  • Just because you’re good at coloring traditionally, doesn’t mean you’re good at coloring digitally. They’re two different things. I’ve seen so many amazing traditional artists that apparently throw out all knowledge of color theory the second they try digital coloring. It’s normal to need time and practice to get used to it, but don’t forget your basics when you make the jump to digital. If you wouldn’t do it in a painting, it shouldn’t be in your Photoshop work.
  • Hideous shape brushes and default Photoshop textures are terrible. Texture is awesome, but not when it’s a piece of crap brick or rock texture getting shat out of a Photoshop filter.
  • Work at no smaller than 300 DPI if you’re working digitally.
  • Scanning is not hard. Stop acting like it is. Know how to properly scan your lineart, because nothing says “I don’t want to be hired” like poorly scanned lineart. (also your colorist will stab you)

  • If you’re not drawing digitally, paper choice matters. Lined paper is not okay. You don’t have to necessarily draw on fancy expensive Blue Line Pro paper, but if you have any interest in selling originals ever, don’t use shit paper.
  • Buying a tablet or a Cintiq when you’re not very good at drawing will not automatically make you a better artist. I work on comics digitally for a living and I don’t even own a Cintiq because I don’t think I need it. If you want to start learning how to draw digitally, be reasonable and buy a Wacom Bamboo/Intuos. (Bamboo is dead now. The new line is Intuos and Intuos Pro, beginners want Intuos) But don’t go into it thinking it will make you a better artist. A tablet is a tool like anything else and it will not polish a turd. It’s all too often I see people starting out dumping $1000+ on a Cintiq because they think it will make them better artists. You don’t buy a fucking $2000+ guitar when you can’t even play a song.
  • You don’t have to color digitally, but be aware it’s not viable for monthly comics in most cases. You can only pull it off if you are a speed demon. I only know of 1-2 artists that is able to do it on a monthly series.

Hope this is helpful! When I went to art college, teachers took off points if pieces weren’t mounted and wrapped properly. I hated it at the time, but it taught me how important it is to present your work like you care about it. The earlier you start, the better.

173,927 notes

iwantedtacosnotthis:

jc-anne:

starkidwholokidhogwarts:

cumleak:

the-unpopular-opinions:

One of these women is despised and hated for being awkward.
The other is applauded and worshipped for the exact same reason.
I know other factors come into play.
But something isn’t right there.

ones an extrovert and ones an introvert voila la différence

One had to portray a disaster of a character, one didn’t

Both were doing their jobs as actresses. One was better written.

^^^ this

iwantedtacosnotthis:

jc-anne:

starkidwholokidhogwarts:

cumleak:

the-unpopular-opinions:

One of these women is despised and hated for being awkward.

The other is applauded and worshipped for the exact same reason.

I know other factors come into play.

But something isn’t right there.

ones an extrovert and ones an introvert voila la différence

One had to portray a disaster of a character, one didn’t

Both were doing their jobs as actresses. One was better written.

^^^ this

(via mmischieffmanagedd)

13,561 notes

We live in a society that’s sexist in ways it doesn’t understand. One of the consequences is that men are extremely sensitive to being criticized by women. I think it threatens them in a very primal way, and male privilege makes them feel free to lash out.

This is why women are socialized to carefully dance around these issues, disagreeing with men in an extremely gentle manner. Not because women are nicer creatures than men. But because our very survival can depend on it.

No skin thick enough: The daily harassment of women in the game industry

The whole article sadly hits very close to home.

(via rosalarian)

(via the-full-grohac)

115 notes

koujakukardashian:

oniisei:

THIS IS THE SECOND TIME IN TWO DAYS STOP REPOSING THIS PICTURE WHAT THE FUCK. THE ARTIST IS UUSUI.TUMBLR.COM AND IF I WASN’T ON MOBILE I WOULD LINK YOU

(x) here’s the original picture in case it hasn’t been added yet 
this is the exact reason weheartit should be eradicated 

koujakukardashian:

oniisei:

THIS IS THE SECOND TIME IN TWO DAYS STOP REPOSING THIS PICTURE WHAT THE FUCK. THE ARTIST IS UUSUI.TUMBLR.COM AND IF I WASN’T ON MOBILE I WOULD LINK YOU

(x) here’s the original picture in case it hasn’t been added yet 

this is the exact reason weheartit should be eradicated 

(Source: chibi-change-myself, via xypeilo)